Lil Sweets

About the Author:

Odie Hawkins an alumnus of the Watts Writers Workshop, (established by Budd Schulberg). His instructors were Louise Meriwether, John . W. Bloch, Al Jenner, Robert Lewin and Harlan Ellison. Hawkins is the author of twenty-eight novels, website: www.odiehawkins.com and google his name.

About the Book

“Lil’ Sweets” is the final distillation of a pimping dynasty. First, there was a rumor that “Lil’ Sweets’s” great-great-great-great grandfather picked up a page from a weekly newspaper and taught himself to read. Just a rumor. He was sold to a Mississippi plantation owner and started pimping the owner’s wife. Just a rumor, but there is often some foundation of truth in many rumors.

There is a foggy area in this dynastic line that deserves closer study, we can definitely say that Mr. Duke Mansion is the father of the modern line of pimps in this socio-psycho/bio. And then his son, “Sweet Peter Deeder”, who begat “Sweet Peter Deeder II” aka “Mr. Sweets”, who begat “Lil Sweets.”

Rumor has it that there is a “Baby Sweets”, “Mo’Sweets” and “Sugar Sweets” on the way. Just a rumor. “Lil’ Sweets”, deeply influenced by his study of Kama Sutra and Machiavelli’s “The Prince”, offers us a candid explanation of how the tradition of African-American pimping got started. “Lil’ Sweets” sticks a lot of tongue in both cheeks, but there is always a layer of truth to be uncovered after the ghetto skin is peeled back.

Endorsement:

“With Lil’ Sweets, Odie Hawkins delivers the final installment in his pimp fiction trilogy twenty-five years in the making.  It tells the story of Sweet Peter Deeder III’s rise to power as a pimp mogul, as he develops the world’s first android prostitutes, known as “robohoes.”  Hawkins—a pioneer of the street fiction genre alongside Iceberg Slim and Donald Goines—delivers a novel that mixes the streetwise lingo of vintage pimp fiction together with scathing satirical commentary about the spread of global capitalism, the Hurricane Katrina disaster, and the AIDS crisis in West Africa.  A classic worthy of the “Sweets” series.”

– Dr. Justin Gifford is a Professor of English Literature at the University of Nevada, Reno. His areas of research and teaching are nineteenth- and twentieth-century American and African American literature, with a focus on popular culture”.